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  • Canine Annual Vaccination Package

    • Exam
    • Heartworm Test
    • Fecal Test
    • Rabies Vaccine
    • DHPP Vaccine

     

    Optional

    • Flu Vaccine
    • Leptospirosis Vaccine
    • Bordetella Vaccine
    • Lymes Vaccine
  • Feline Annual Vaccination Package

    • Exam
    • Fecal Test
    • Rabies Vaccine
    • FVRCP Vaccine
    • FELV (leukemia) Vaccine

     

    Optional

    • FELV/FIV Test

     

  • On Appointment Day.....To lessen your pets discomfort and stress, if you are able, collect a fresh (day of the appointment) stool sample from your pet and bring it in for testing. If you are not able, then we will collect the sample at the time of the exam.

    You can scoop a small sample in to a zip lock bag or other clean container.

  • Dog Vaccines

    Dogs and puppies are at risk for several serious diseases. Take a moment to learn a little about them, the threat they pose to your pet, and see which vaccines are required by law. And remember, even if your dog is an “inside” dog, he or she is still at risk

    Rabies

    Rabies is always fatal. Rabies virus attacks the central nervous system of the animal, leading to an agonizing death. Infection is usually transmitted via the saliva of a rabid animal through a bite, through contamination of scratch wounds, or through mucosal membranes. Because rabies can be transmitted from infected animals to humans, it can pose a serious public health concern if an outbreak is suspected or reported. Most states have laws requiring rabies vaccines.

    Canine Distemper

    Canine distemper is a viral infection that can affect a dog's respiratory, gastrointestinal, and central nervous system. In affected dogs, clinical signs vary depending on age, immune status of the host, and virus strain. Common signs of illness include fever, loss of appetite, tiredness, and upper respiratory tract infection.

    Canine Parvovirus (CPV) Infection

    Canine parvovirus infection, commonly referred to as CPV or canine “parvo,” is highly contagious and attacks quickly. CPV can spread to dogs from any animal, human, or object that comes in contact with feces of an infected dog. The virus can survive for months on objects such as food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors. Treatment is difficult and often involves hospitalization. Clinical signs include severe vomiting, loss of appetite and bloody, foul-smelling diarrhea.

    Canine Hepatitis

    Canine hepatitis is a viral disease caused by canine adenovirus (CAV)-1. It affects the liver, kidneys, and eyes in dogs. Clinical signs include fever, vomiting, coughing, and eye inflammation.

    Canine Parainfluenza

    Canine parainfluenza is a highly contagious respiratory disease. It produces an acute cough in dogs. Viral shedding persists for 8 to 10 days after infection. Clinical signs include high-pitched cough, nasal discharge, and episodes of gagging.

    Canine Coronavirus Infection

    Canine coronavirus infection (CCV) is an intestinal disease in dogs. It’s caused by the canine coronavirus and is highly contagious. An infected dog can shed virus for up to 6 months. Puppies are most at risk of developing serious complications with this virus. CCV is spread through the feces of infected dogs. Clinical signs include diarrhea, vomiting and anorexia.

    Leptospirosis

    Leptospirosis is a disease caused by infection of the Leptospira bacteria. Transmission may result from contaminated water sources, soil, and food. Large-breed, outdoor dogs are commonly affected, with young dogs more severely affected than adult dogs. Clinical signs include fever, loss of appetite, vomiting, shivering, and muscle tenderness, as well as liver and kidney dysfunction.

    Lyme disease

    Lyme disease comes from ticks that carry the bacteria. Lyme disease affects many dogs differently. Some may not display any clinical signs. Others may start with limping, swelling in the lymph nodes, and fever, and can progress to loss of appetite and lethargy. Lyme disease can also attack dogs’ joints, causing serious pain. Antibiotics can help treat the disease, but do not eliminate the disease-causing bacteria transmitted by tick bites. As a result, Lyme disease is recurring and can strike an infected dog again and again. Although direct infection or disease transmission is not yet documented in every state, cases of Lyme disease in dogs have been reported throughout the country.

    Bordetella

    Bordetella is also referred to as infectious tracheobronchitis. This infection is in the trachea, or windpipe, and the lower respiratory passages, or bronchi. It is an extremely contagious upper respiratory disease that spreads among dogs through the air. The distinctive honking cough is a sign of Bordetella, which is caused by a viral or bacterial infection, or possibly both types of infections. Symptoms are generally mild and last seven to 10 days; but if your dog also has a viral infection, this time period can extend to three weeks or longer.

    Canine Influenza Virus H3N2 + H3N8

    Canine influenza viruses (CIV H3N8 and CIV H3N2) cause a respiratory infection in dogs that is often referred to as 'Canine Flu'. Canine influenza virus (CIV) is one of the causes of CIRDC (Canine Infectious Disease Complex) - also called 'Canine Cough' or 'Kennel Cough'. Two different canine influenza viruses have been isolated in the US. Canine influenza viruses are relatively new viruses, so virtually all dogs are susceptible to infection when they are newly exposed because they have not built up natural immunity. Most dogs that develop CIV infection have a mild illness, but some dogs become very sick and require treatment.

  • Cat Vaccines

    Cats and kittens are at risk for several serious diseases. Take a moment to learn a little about them, the threat they pose to your pet and see which vaccines are required by law. And remember, even if your cat is an “inside” cat, he or she is still at risk.

    Rabies

    Rabies is always fatal. Rabies virus attacks the central nervous system of the animal, leading to an agonizing death. Infection is usually transmitted via the saliva of a rabid animal, through a bite, through contamination of scratch wounds or via mucosal membranes. Because rabies can be transmitted from infected animals to humans, it can pose a serious public health concern if an outbreak is suspected or reported. Most states have laws requiring rabies vaccines.

    Feline Panleukopenia (Feline distemper)

    Feline Panleukopenia is caused by feline parvovirus. Panleukopenia causes high mortality in kittens. It is highly contagious and is spread through contact with an infected animal's bodily fluids or feces. It can be spread through contact with bedding, food dishes, or even by the clothing and shoes of those who handle infected animals. Clinical signs include loss of appetite, fever, and frequent vomiting.

    Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR)

    Feline viral rhinotrachetitis is a highly contagious respiratory disease characterized by sneezing, loss of appetite, fever, and eye inflammation. As the disease progresses, a discharge is noticeable from both nose and eyes.

    Feline Calicivirus (FCV)

    Feline calicivirus is a serious feline respiratory infection. Often occurring simultaneously with feline viral rhinotracheitis. Signs of infection are similar to FVR (fever, loss of appetite, nasal discharge), but calicivirus-infected cats may also have ulcers on the tongue.

    Feline Pneumonitis

    Feline pneumonitis is caused by the organism Chlamydia psittaci. Signs of pneumonitis are similar to those of FVR and FCV (sneezing, fever, loss of appetite, nasal discharge, inflamed eyes.

    Feline Leukemia Virus

    Feline Leukemia occurs worldwide and is a common cause of fatality in cats. The disease is spread through contact with saliva or blood, or from sharing food and water dishes with an infected cat. A cat fight is a common way of contacting those fluids, but social grooming can spread the virus. Even cats that appear healthy can be infected with the virus. Kittens are especially vulnerable; they can contract the disease in their mother’s womb, or after birth through mother’s milk. The virus attacks the cat's immune system, leading to immune system suppression, increased risk of certain cancers, and suppression of the bone marrow. Clinical signs can vary, but include pale gums, yellow in the whites of eyes, fever, loss of appetite, and breathing difficulty.